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Ho Ho Oh No! Top 10 Foods Your Pet Must Avoid This Holiday Season

This holiday season, you may be throwing a big party to celebrate with family. Or maybe an enjoyable dinner with your closest friends in your diary. Regardless of the specifics of your plan, there is one thing that will almost certainly be a common element – food.

At this time of year, people break out old family recipes and go bold by trying new ones – resulting in tables overflowing with delectable, festive dishes. We shouldn’t forget the furry loved ones, your dogs and cats, who want to join in the party as well.  But this poses the question: can we share little nibbles of this holiday food with our fur babies?

Not as such.

In a perfect world dogs and cats would not eat any human food at all but, as many pet owners will tell you, they tend to snatch a piece or two- whether it is fed to them or not. Oftentimes the dishes we prepare during the holiday season are loaded with harmful ingredients to dogs and cats. While they may be tasty to us, they can often be lethal for our furry friends. Yes. Lethal.

The following ten ingredients are evident in the popular holiday foods that your animal should never consume. As you will see, they are all quite common for “the most wonderful time of the year.”

1. Chocolate. Of all the items on this list, Chocolate is well known as an enemy to pets, and rightfully so. It contains Theobromine, which is a diuretic. This dangerous alkaloid causes seizures, severe heart problems, and death in both cats and dogs. The darker the Chocolate the more dangerous it is, but not even milk or white Chocolates should be consumed.

2. Onions. As well its cousin Garlic, Onions should be avoided. They possess the ability to cause anemia, breathing issues, and vomiting. The big problem with Onions is that they come in many forms and are incorporated into many processed foods. Snack foods often have Onion powder listed as an ingredient.

3. Salt.
Speaking of common ingredients, Salt is everywhere. As you could imagine, this causes dehydration. However more severe consumption can lead to sodium ion poisoning. Fevers, diarrhea, tremors, and even death are all possibilities. Salt is in countless recipes, which emphasizes the fact that cats and dogs should not eat table food of any kind.

4. Cinnamon. This ingredient offers a host of health benefits for humans including help with hearth health and low blood sugar. However, cats and dogs need to stay away. This spice can cause painful blisters in their mouths and vomiting. Additionally, if the spice is inhaled it can cause lung damage. Cinnamon isn’t only in foods either – scented decorations and many other seasonal items pose pet health risks.

5. Alcohol. Think about all the alcohol a human has to consume to get liver damage. A cat or dog needs just a sliver of that to cause serious and often permanent harm. This can easily cause alcohol poisoning, comas, and death. Studies show that alcohol-induced death for cats and dogs is more common than you may think. Stay smart, and please keep your pets away from egg nog and champagne this holiday season.

6. Xylitol. Don’t have any Xylitol in your pantry? Think again. This is a product which is often used as a sugar substitute in products including gum, toothpaste, and also often used in baked goods. During this time of year, you’ll find Xylitol lurking in many festive candies. While cats should not ingest Xylitol, dogs are especially susceptible. There have been well reported cases of seizures, vomiting, and liver failure.

7. Caffeinated Drinks. Caffeine directly affects a cat or dog’s heart. It may be amusing to think of your pet running around in a hyper frenzy, but the reality is much more serious. They often have difficulty controlling their breath, cannot sit still, and in many cases die. Soda, coffee, tea, chocolate, and energy drinks should be kept away.

8. Dairy. Newsflash, contrary to popular belief, Milk and Milk products can actually disrupt a cat’s stomach. Unfortunately, dogs are no exception. These pets shouldn’t be drinking the Milk you leave for Santa. Diarrhea, cramps, and various food poisonings are possibilities.

9. Raisins. Raisins and Grapes seem like they shouldn’t bee on this list, but actually they can cause kidney failure, especially in dogs. Those oatmeal raisin cookies should be kept far away from Fido.

10. Bones from the table. That’s right — you shouldn’t give Bones to your dog. It may seem like a very odd thing to say, but the threat is real. Bones, particularly those from chickens or turkeys can easily splinter and then puncture or cut their throats or internal organs. Resist your urges to “give a dog a bone” for the sake of their health.

Your pets deserve a great holiday season. Don’t put a damper on the festivities by allowing them to get into food with these ingredients. Instead, give them something they will really love like a nutritious and delicious soft chew. They are extremely popular items in the pet industry and are available in a variety of flavors!

Want to create your own delicious line of private label supplement dog soft chews?  We can help!  Get in touch today with our team at Private Label Supplement. Call 855-209-0225 (US Press 2 for Sales)  to find out more information on pricing and MOQ’s today. Don’t forget to ask how we can save you $7-$10K.

All my best,
Stefani Thionnet
Stay focused and never give up!

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Stefani Thionnet

Owner & CEO, Private Label Supplement. A cowboy entrepreneur and 26+ year veteran in the health & wellness industry, Stefani thrives on Clients’ success and is relentlessly seeking new ways to deliver quality GMP product that furthers a company’s marketing and drives volume with the confidence that comes from successful strategic partnerships. With an inventive, innovative approach to product development, and a commitment to Client relations, her professional motto is, “If we are lucky enough to fill one order but haven’t earned your repeat business, we haven’t done our job.”

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